How MacEwan University Created Accessible Learning Resources, and the Impact on Student Perceptions of their Learning.

How MacEwan University Created Accessible Learning Resources, and the Impact on Student Perceptions of their Learning

Live Broadcast Date: Wednesday, August 15, 2018
Time: 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Eastern (UTC - 4 hours)
Length: 1.5 hours
Speakers: Laurie Osbaldeston, Senior Assistive Technology Specialist, MacEwan University

Target Audience:  AT Professionals, Course Designers, Disability Services Professionals
Skill Level:  All levels 

Register for How MacEwan University Created Accessible Learning Resources, and the Impact on Student Perceptions of their Learning. 

Overview: 

In this session, Laurie Osbaldeston will introduce you to a research project teaming MacEwan University's Centre for the Advancement of Faculty Excellence and Services to Students with Disabilities departments. In this project, academics create accessible learning resources for all students using Sonocent software for Windows and Mac. The project is focused on looking at the ways which access to the software, resources and class recordings has affected students perception of their learning. You will also learn about ways to partner with faculty, and MacEwan's plans for expanding the research throughout the University.

Objectives:

  • Participants will discover why MacEwan embarked on this research project and its impact on the wider possibility of inclusive design
  • Participants will learn how to involve faculty in your inclusive practices initiatives and the logistics of implementing software access and availability to accessible learning resources
  • Participants will explore how students' perception of their learning experience at MacEwan University has been changed by inclusive practices

Speaker Bio:

Laurie Osbaldeston is the Senior Assistive Technology Specialist at MacEwan University in Edmonton, Canada. She has worked in the field of AT and accessibility for post-secondary students for 18 years. Prior to that, Laurie taught in several post-secondary institutions in Alberta. Throughout her career she has seen the growth and normalization of accessibility in many areas of her work; however, she feels there is still much to be done. Laurie views participation in research as a means by which to spread the message of accessibility and its benefits. She continues to work and advocate for education for all. 

 


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